© 2018 A-1 Trade & Loan Ltd.

Missing rear plate.  Rare and Discontinued.

File under Mordern Synchromatics

Eras The rebirth years 1988-2002

 

Modern Synchromatics

In 1999 the existence of the budget Synchromatic line was one of the biggest mysteries of the modern Gretsch era. The revered Synchromatic name, traditionally reserved for high-end acoustic archtops, was plastered across a dizzying array of budget-priced, Korean-made guitars. Even more baffling, the new Synchros were near-clones of the Electromatic and Historic lines introduced at the same time.

Nobody — not even Gretsch — could keep track of all the overlapping models, and the short-lived Synchromatic series was merged into a single (and much-improved) Electromatic line-up in 2003.

In 1999 the existence of the budget Synchromatic line was one of the biggest mysteries of the modern Gretsch era. The revered Synchromatic name, traditionally reserved for high-end acoustic archtops, was plastered across a dizzying array of budget-priced, Korean-made guitars. Even more baffling, the new Synchros were near-clones of the Electromatic and Historic lines introduced at the same time.

Nobody — not even Gretsch — could keep track of all the overlapping models, and the short-lived Synchromatic series was merged into a single (and much-improved) Electromatic line-up in 2003.

In 1999 the existence of the budget Synchromatic line was one of the biggest mysteries of the modern Gretsch era. The revered Synchromatic name, traditionally reserved for high-end acoustic archtops, was plastered across a dizzying array of budget-priced, Korean-made guitars. Even more baffling, the new Synchros were near-clones of the Electromatic and Historic lines introduced at the same time.

Nobody — not even Gretsch — could keep track of all the overlapping models, and the short-lived Synchromatic series was merged into a single (and much-improved) Electromatic line-up in 2003.

Gretsch Synchromatic Jet Pro G1554 + Soft Case (V.G.+)

C$1,053.00Price
    0